Brompton Library Graphic Novel Reading Group – July

For July’s session (Thursday 7th, 6pm), we will be discussing the graphic novel behemoth that is ‘WATCHMEN’ by Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons:

WatchmenGN

“In an alternate world where the mere presence of American superheroes changed history, the US won the Vietnam War, Nixon is still president, and the cold war is in full effect. ”

Watchmen begins as a murder-mystery, but soon unfolds into a planet-altering conspiracy.

In the mid-eighties, Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons created Watchmen, changing the course of comic history and essentially remaking how popular culture perceived the genre. Popularly cited as the point where comics came of age, Watchmen’s sophisticated take on superheroes has been universally acclaimed for its psychological depth and realism.”

If you have any other suggestions for the reading list then please let me know and we’ll try our best to accommodate.

So far we have the following for consideration:

  • Ghost World
  • Transmetropolitan
  • Sandman
  • 20th century Boys
  • Promethia
  • Fight Club
  • Swamp Thing
  • Democracy
  • Trees
  • Diary of a Teenage Girl
  • Miracleman
  • Hip Hop Family Tree
  • Pride of Baghdad
  • The Bad Doctor
  • Y: The Last Man

The reading group takes place on the first Thursday evening of every month.

See you there! Bring snacks!

David Bushell
Customer Services Assistant
Brompton Library

Brompton Library Graphic Novel Reading Group

Hello and welcome to the Brompton Library Graphic Novel Reading Group

As most of you know, at the next group meeting (Thursday 5 May, 6pm) we will be discussing ‘Killing and Dying’ by Adrian Tomine.

KillingandDying

Here is a review:

From the master of the small gesture, this collection of stories and characters comprises a fraught, realist masterpiece about the weight of love and its absence, the pride and disappointment of family, and the anxiety and hopefulness of being alive in the 21st century.

For June’s session, we will be reading ‘The Walking Dead Volume 1: Days Gone Bye’ by Robert Kirkman, who wrote ‘Invincible’ which we read before, and Walking Dead is now a popular TV series.

WalkingDeadV1

Here’s the blurb:

“The world we knew is gone. The world of commerce and frivolous necessity has been replaced by a world of survival and responsibility. An epidemic of apocalyptic proportions has swept the globe, causing the dead to rise and feed on the living. In a matter of months society has crumbled: no government, no grocery stores, no mail delivery, no cable TV. In a world ruled by the dead, the survivors are forced to finally start living.”

 If you have any other suggestions for the reading list then please let me know and we’ll try our best to accommodate.

So far we have the following for consideration:

  • Democracy
  • Trees
  • Watchmen
  • Diary of a Teenage Girl
  • Miracleman
  • Hip Hop Family Tree
  • Pride of Baghdad
  • The Bad Doctor
  • Y: The Last Man

See you all soon!

David Bushell
Customer Services Assistant, Brompton Library

Brompton Library Graphic Novel Reading Group – Assemble!

From Christian Stevens & David Bushell at Brompton Library:

On Thursday 3rd July Brompton Library hosted its first ever Graphic Novels reading group. We were discussing the frankly crazy yet genius fantasy graphic novel Saga (Volume 1) by Brian K Vaughan. The heat of the day was tempered by the special occasion refreshments and good company, some of whom we knew, along with some surprise visitors from elsewhere who shared our enthusiasm for the art form.

The first ever Graphic Novels reading group at Brompton Library, July 2015
The first ever Graphic Novels reading group at Brompton Library, July 2015

It was easy for the flow of conversation to get started as we laughed about the very adult themes in the book and the funny content, as well as a collective admiration for the artwork and storytelling within, along with our own personal stories of discovering the joys of graphic novels.

Chew by John LaymanIn the end it was all good fun and the feeling of something more regular and established was begun, with us looking forward to the next event – which is today, Thursday 6th August.

If you’re interested please come along! Don’t be shy. We will be discussing Chew by John Layman.

 

Brompton’s March round-up

Our Brompton Librarians write:

Hello to all our lovely readers!

Well, it looks like spring has finally sprung around town. Without wishing to jinx it, let’s hope the rain stays away for a while because everything looks so much nicer in the sunshine!

On the 8th March we celebrated International Women’s Day, and made a display for it that included books by important female writers such as Mary Shelley and Margaret Atwood and non-fiction titles that explored the history of women’s rights. We also have a current display on historical fiction that will appeal to fans of Hilary Mantel, so come in and check it out!

Christian Stevens

Historical Fiction
Historical Fiction

Chatterbooks  

Chatterbooks is a huge success with the children in Brompton library; always buzzing with creative children wanting to share their ideas. This reading club encourages them to read books, write reviews, recommend the books to each other and on top of everything chatting a lot (hahaha!).

Most of the time the children will select a theme for their next meeting. This month the group decided to write about favourite books/authors/characters on the paper leaves and stuck them on a paper tree. They were so enthusiastic that they drew the pictures of their favourite characters as well. Then they displayed it on the Chatterbooks wall in the children’s library.

For the next Chatterbooks session in April, the children will be bringing one friend along and discussing Private Peaceful by Michael Morpurgo. Oh how noisy it will be? But we love it!!!! (to find out more, or to join our Chatterbooks group, please see the RBKC libraries website).

Babita Sinha

 Brompton Library Reading Group

 On Tuesday night (after a lively discussion about what West-End productions everyone had seen) we chatted about ‘A Tale for the Time Being’ by Ruth Ozeki. An author, living on a remote island in the States finds a washed-up Hello Kitty bag on the shoreline. Thinking that this must have come from the time of the tsunami, she opens it up to discover some documents and diaries inside. These include the diary of a Japanese teenager, a bright and vibrant girl whose family is really going through the ringer. Nao is very inspired however by her 106 year old great-grandmother -a Buddhist nun- and by the diaries of her great-uncle who details his training as a kamikaze pilot.

 Short-listed for the Booker Prize last year, Ozeki really drew praise from the group with regards to her creativity of story-line and her prose (particularly one member remarked) of Hiroshima and her great uncles animosity to serve for his country. We all loved the character of Nao and her great-grandmother especially, we felt this was much stronger than the author and her husband (maybe this was intentional).

As gruelling as it was in parts, it was a very inspiring read and it was great to see how Nao and her family’s characters evolved, hopefully for the better. The quantum mechanics section at the end let it down slightly, however we would still highly recommend this book (to find out more about our reading groups, or to join, please see the RBKC libraries website).

Katie Collis

 

The Brompton Blog – November 2013

 Hello library lovers!

As we started these posts around this time last year we are proud to celebrate a full year of bloggery, fun and learning on the Old Brompton Road. This month we have been busy with class visits, craft /story-time events and our new homework club for children age 7-11 which has proved popular and is aimed at giving children extra support with their studies, hopefully helping to boost their confidence in school. Sessions run Tuesdays and Thursdays 15:30-17:00.

Did you know that this month is Michael Morpurgo’s 70th birthday? From michaelmorpurgo.com:

 November 2013 sees a month-long celebration of Michael Morpurgo’s wonderful stories, marking his 70th birthday this year. We’re inviting book lovers, schools, libraries and bookshops nationwide to take part and celebrate 30 unmissable books by one of our greatest writers for children.

Throughout November the Michael Morpurgo website is hosting free teacher resources, brand new author videos, audio downloads and competitions, focusing on a different book each day. From War Horse to Beowulf and the Butterfly Lion to Kensuke’s Kingdom, celebrate 70 years of Michael Morpurgo’s stories this November.

 We love Mr. Morpurgo so we have made a display with a selection of his work.

Michael Morpurgo display at Brompton Library
Michael Morpurgo display at Brompton Library

Half-term craft and events

One of our favourite rhymes at our usual Thursday morning Story Time is Incy Wincy Spider. So for our half-term and Halloween craft we made paper-plate spider webs. We punched holes around a paper-plate, wove wool through and across to make the web and then stuck on a spider.

 For our monthly craft session we took inspiration from autumn leaves. We cut strips of card long enough to go around our heads, stuck on a length of double sided tape and then stuck leaves onto the tape to make a leaf crown. It was very quick and successful!

‘Down, down, yellow & brown, autumn leaves all over the ground’
‘Down, down, yellow & brown, autumn leaves all over the ground’

Reading Group

On Tuesday our Reading Group discussed The Cleaner of Chartres by Salley Vickers. Set around the cathedral of Chartres, it is about a woman called Agnes Morel who cleans the cathedral but also does odd jobs for various people of the town. Agnes is anxious to stay in the background and have a quiet life, after being brought up in the harsh environment of a nunnery and experiencing a pregnancy at a young age, and is determined to forge a new life. Despite this, she touches the hearts of the many people that she helps and slowly they acknowledge this lovely but troubled woman.

The Cleaner of Chartres
The Cleaner of Chartres

I think that all of us agreed that this was an easy book to read as it was so well written. Although the story weaved back and forth in time it was very convincing. The collection of the town’s characters was well conceived; especially the sniping and gossiping friends who are really enemies who gave it a comical but also tragic edge. After reading those Booker Prize novels, this book felt like slipping into a warm bath – a book that could be enjoyed on a cold winter’s day and with a few hours to spare.

It’s amazing what topics of conversation flow in our Reading Group – from discussing The Luminaries, we then discussed the equally Antipodean The Thornbirds. We then jumped onto great TV dramas that we had watched in the eighties such as The Far Pavilions, a Passage to India and The Jewel in the Crown. Listening and discussing various topics and sharing each other’s company is equally as important as discussing the monthly book – it is a cathartic and engaging experience.

Next month’s Reading Group book is Life After Life by Kate Atkinson. I can’t wait to read this!

Man Booker Prize – reading challenge update

Katie Collis, Senior Customer Services Assistant at Brompton Library sets herself an annual reading challenge – to read all six titles on the Man Booker shortlist.  The winner will be announced on Tuesday 15 October 2013.

Man Booker Prize 2013
Man Booker Prize 2013

Katie first updated us this year in last month’s Brompton Blog post and here’s her latest update….

I’m m already well into my Booker books, although still four more to go and we are already into October!

I tackled the lightest volume of the short-listed six, which was:

The Testament of Mary by Colm Toibin

The Testament of Mary by Colm Toibin
The Testament of Mary by Colm Toibin

Set entirely from the point of Mary, mother of Jesus, it starts with a stream of conscious thought that meticulously melds into a story. It charts the series of events leading up to the crucifixion and Mary’s fate afterwards. At 103 pages it is pared down language. Mary’s human acceptance of her son’s death and her own lot transcends humanity – indeed her view of the world of men is very critical and although she loves her son she mistrusts his preaching and work. I must have read this in less than a day, but like most powerful books it makes you think for much longer, it is a terribly moving piece of work. As with Usula Le Guin’s Lavinia, Toibin breathes some life into the story of a woman who we don’t know an awful lot about and who we all would want to.

We Need New Names by NoViolet Bulawayo

We Need New Names by NoViolet Bulawayo
We Need New Names by NoViolet Bulawayo

Set in a shanty-town called Paradise in Zimbabwe, it follows 12 year old Darling as she and her group of young cohorts steal guavas from nearby ‘Budapest’ and lives with her grandmother ‘Mother of Bones’ and attends church. She is then whisked off to Michigan to live with her aunt and her family and experiences a new live which is overwhelmingly different from her native ‘Zim’.

This to me is like a cross between The Sisters Brothers (Patrick Dewitt) and Pigeon English (Stephen Kelman), hilarious and awful in parts, very moving but bleak. It is a very easy book to read and zips by, the only aspect of it which was not convincing was Darling’s transition to the States, the flow of her wonderful language became more stilted and unimpressive. Still, Bulawayo is a gifted writer and her tributes to Achebe (the father of African literature) was affecting, especially in relation to Zimbabwe’s troubles and what might have been Darling’s life there.

Harvest by Jim Crace

Harvest by Jim Crace
Harvest by Jim Crace

Set in a post Middle-Ages but pre-Industrial village (all very Lark Rise to Candleford) it is about a group of labourers who are working on the land for themselves and for the lord of the manor. All of a sudden three strangers turn up and erect a makeshift shelter for themselves with the idea that they will stay. The villagers xenophobic feelings are unleashed and before long ‘Mistress Pandemonium and Master Chaos rule’.

It is very slow burner of a book, and you can see that something cataclysmic is going to happen. The writing is particularly beautiful and the main character is a lovely guy and an effective narrator. I just found it very boring in places and not really that believable. I would expect something of the calibre of his writing to be short-listed for the Man Booker and it focussed on lots of important issues but personally I had to force myself to read it!

The Lowland by Jhumpa Lahiri

The Lowland by Jhumpa Lahiri
The Lowland by Jhumpa Lahiri

It is post World War Two and two brothers negotiate round the high walls of the colonial country house on the outskirts of Calcutta, looking for golf balls and adventure. Naturally curious and bright, they excel in their studies but their path leads them in various directions. It is the younger brother who is fired with passion about his country’s future and wants to fight what he believes is an oppressive state. The older brother wants a quieter life where he can pursue his academic studies; this eventually takes him to the United States. However a series of events causes their lives and their loved ones to change.

I cannot really give more away of the story. I read this book in just one sitting – it is a brilliant piece of work. It is beautifully narrated, the characters are believable (I adored the older brother) and it is extremely moving. It is an example that if one is a slave to a cause or a movement then that person neglects those around them, with terrible consequences that can last generations. Out of the four books that I have read this is my favourite and I think Lahiri is every bit of a powerful story-teller as Andrea Levy.

So two more books to read – and with under a week to go it’s going to be a tight race!

Katie Collis
Katie Collis Katie Collis

Katie Collis

Senior Customer Services Assistant, Brompton Library

The Brompton Blog – September 2013

Hello readers, welcome to the September edition of the Brompton Blog.

We have had great success over the summer with the children’s Reading Challenge and the ongoing craft and story-time sessions that have proved so popular with local families (almost double the amount of kids signed up compared to last year!).

This month the wonderful people at the Lancashire Family History Society had a free open day where members of the public were invited to learn about the organisation and get advice in tracing their own family history. The event proved to be successful with people returning to the library with their newly acquired knowledge and using our computers to log into the Ancestry website and start to delve into their own genealogies.

Resident literary connoisseur Katie Collis gives an insight into the monthly reading group book:

This month we read and discussed The Daylight Gate by Jeanette Winterson. Set during the witch trials in 1612 (the most famous or infamous in English history) in Pendle, Northumbria – it is about a group of 13 folk who are set upon by the local magistrates and his posse, bent on accusations of witchcraft and sorcery. Riding to the defence of this ‘Sabbat’ is one Alice Nutter, beautiful and independent, who is determined to defend this group of unhappy folk.

The Daylight Gate by Jeanette Winterson
The Daylight Gate by Jeanette Winterson

This book really separated the group into severe likes and dislikes. I thought that it was a brave piece of writing and that Winterson had stepped out of her own comfort zone and tackled something which although has been written about many times, does not have much first-hand evidence of the accused. We do know that the central characters existed, but it feels like Winterson has really breathed life back into them and given the story her own slant, which some in our group thought maybe was a little OTT. Many felt that there was no flim-flam to the writing; it was pared down which in turn made it easy to read. However some could not get past the second chapter because they felt the beginning was slow and that some of the content was very graphic and gruesome in places!

New additions to our stock

Star Trek Into Darkness
Star Trek Into Darkness

We have some great new graphic novels in this month with titles including X-Men (Simon Spurrier), Locke and Key (Joe Hill) and the Invincible Iron Man (Matt Fraction) as well as new popular DVD titles Star Trek: Into Darkness and Olympus Has Fallen. Also we will be running taster sessions on the history of design; check in the library for more details.

Locke and Key graphic novel
Locke and Key graphic novel

by Christian Stevens

Christian Stevens
Christian Stevens

Man Booker Prize 2013 – The reading challenge!

It’s that time of the year again where I stretch the little grey cells and read all six short-listed books – the deadline this year is 15 October when the winner will be announced.

The shortlist has crept up on me and by gosh it is a truly international spread of countries: Canada, UK, Ireland, New Zealand and for the first time, an author from Zimbabwe. They are:

We Need New Names (NoViolet Bulawayo)

  • The Luminaries (Eleanor Catton)
  • Harvest (Jim Crace)
  • The Lowland (Jhumpa Lahiri)
  • A Tale for the Time Being (Ruth Ozeki)
  • The Testament of Mary (Colm Toibin)

Hailed as ‘the most diverse in recent memory’ (Robert McFarlane, Chair of Booker Prize panel this year), it’s exciting that there are only 2 names that I have come across before and 6 new authors to read!

Will keep you posted!

by Katie Collis

Katie Collis
Katie Collis

CelebrateMyLibrary event Part 2

Celebrate My library
Celebrate My library

Last month I wrote about the first part of CelebrateMyLibrary’s Creepy House story-writing workshop when a group of children created a story collaboratively, each wrote their own endings and made wonderful craft models to illustrate their story. We were then kept on tenterhooks all summer before seeing the story in all its glory in book form. On 7 September the waiting was over and we all met up again at Brompton for “the great reveal”.

Hilary and Victoria read the book to the kids who wrote it
Hilary and Victoria read the book to the kids who wrote it

Parents were told to go away for an hour while Hilary and Victoria showed the book to the children first and read the book back to them. At the previous workshop the story had been drafted but this was the first time the children could read it through from beginning to end. They then got to work on making costumes so they could act out the story to their parents whilst one of them would read it out.

Making costumes
Making costumes

Finally the parents were allowed back into the room and the play began! We were treated to a scary bat, Fluffy the cat, a monstrous whale and even a creepy house.

Scenes from the play 1
Scenes from the play 1
Scenes from the play 2
Scenes from the play 2

The parents were bowled over by what their children had achieved, not just that afternoon creating the costumes and remembering their parts in the play but with the book as well. All the children’s names were included as authors and all their separate endings were printed.

Here is a sample of the book. The wonderful graphic designer had photographed their models and incorporated them into the illustrations of the story.

Pages from the Creepy Library book
Pages from the Creepy Library book

At Brompton we have a display copy which is well worth a look. The production values are high, the colours grab your attention and the overall design and content is just fantastic. As a workshop for kids I totally recommend CelebrateMyLibrary as they tap into so many creative outlets and the kids just love it!

The Brompton Blog – August 2013

Brompton Library
Brompton Library

Hello and a warm welcome to the August edition of our monthly blog post. The lovely sunshine has finally arrived and despite scorching temperatures, our library has remained a popular destination for tourists, students and residents over these last few weeks. Our biggest success story is the Summer Reading Challenge (you can read more about this in our Summer Reading Challenge blog post). Well, we hate to boast, but so far 183 kids have signed up here for the challenge, of which 54 have successfully read all 6 books and received their stickers, medals and certificates with more children joining in every day. So a big well done to all those young boys and girls who have risen to the challenge!! Do you have children and are running out of ideas to keep them busy over the holiday? Pop into our library and pick up one of the Summer in the City booklets or download the digital version. Also we are approaching that time of the year when over 700 of London’s most interesting buildings are opened to the public over a weekend in September for the Open House London. We have copies of the booklet now available to collect for free for anyone interested.

Celebrate My Library at Brompton Library

Celebrate My Library logo
Celebrate My Library logo

To celebrate the start of this year’s Summer Reading Challenge Brompton Library teamed up with Celebrate my Library who presented a fantastic story writing workshop based on the Creepy House theme.  Check out their website to find out more about Celebrate My Library. The aim of the workshop was to stimulate their creativity to the max in the context of the library. The kids collectively created the main story (with a little help from their friends, Hilary and Victoria, from Celebrate My Library and their graphic artist friend, Lisa).

Celebrate My Library in action
Celebrate My Library in action

The kids then each came up with their own individual ending to the story, so the story will have seven different endings and then they rolled up their sleeves and got messily creative with paper, glue, glitter and scissors to make models and pictures to illustrate the story. All the while Lisa was story boarding the results of the brainstorming on the windows of our meeting room.

Story ideas
Story ideas

We are now eagerly awaiting the published results of all this creativity! We have a second event next month (Saturday 7 September) when the children and their families will get to see all their names in print with the story and their own endings. Over the summer holiday Celebrate My Library will have been beavering away to put the book together and even I am looking forward to seeing the result!

The kids creating their story boards
The kids creating their story boards

Budding Maestros

A budding maestro with the piano tutor
A budding maestro with the piano tutor

Over the school summer holidays Brompton Library has had its own piano tutor-in-residence! Rosario approached us to offer his services for free so for a morning and an afternoon each week people have been taking up the 40-minute slots. Nearly all these sessions were booked up, mostly by children. Rosario did get some adult students too- my colleague Babita gave it a go and was very impressed. She said he had given her the confidence to know that she could continue if she wanted to. I’m very pleased to think that these tasters at Brompton Library may have encouraged a few people to take up a real musical instrument – libraries are about music as well as books!

Stephanie Webb
Stephanie Webb

Stephanie Webb

Lending Librarian

Our reading group

We are very proud to be discussing a novel that comes from one of our very own group! Rheagan Greene is the author of The Samurai Revival trilogy. Last year we read the first volume, Bitter Truths and Rheagan came to Brompton Library to speak to us about it.

Bitter Justice by Rheagan Greene
Bitter Justice by Rheagan Greene

The second volume, Bitter Justice follows the fortunes (and misfortunes) of heroine Tess, who in her role as a Peacekeeper (an international group who help maintain world order) keep in check the volatile Calver Cats, run by Tess’s brother, Beauchamp. After her intensive training Tess is issued with a series of missions to overset this violent group and also to avenge her friend Penny and loved ones. Pain, anger and fear are at every step for her and it becomes more difficult to find her inner-self and equate it to what she is developing into. Rheagan’s book was warmly received by the group – for me it felt like an Indiana Jones story, with exotic locations, sinister characters and overall adventure. One member felt that the plot was brilliant: slick and pacey and she felt glad about an opportunity to read something that she normally doesn’t! We all loved the concept of the peacekeepers and their international mission – something very science fiction and yet all very familiar somehow. Overall we all thoroughly enjoyed the book and we eagerly anticipate the third and final part!

The Daylight Gate by Jeanette Winterson
The Daylight Gate by Jeanette Winterson

The next reading group will be meeting on Tuesday 3 September, 6.30pm and will be discussing the novel The Daylight Gate by Jeanette Winterson – please do come along.

Katie Collis
Katie Collis

Katie Collis

Senior Customer Services Assistant

The Brompton Blog – July 2013

Brompton Library
Brompton Library

Hello, hola, ciao, as-salām ‘alaykum, cześć

My name is Christian and I work at as a Senior Customer Services Assistant at Brompton Library. On behalf of all the staff here we welcome all our customers and readers from around the world to the latest edition of The Brompton Blog.

For those of you who don’t know Brompton Library, we are a medium-sized library eight minutes walk from Earls Court tube station. Local residents, people who work nearby, students and tourists all use Brompton Library – we have something for everyone.

Christian Stevens
Christian Stevens

Christian Stevens

Senior Customer Services Assistant

The Summer Reading Challenge and Chatterbooks

Creepy House banner
Creepy House banner

We’ve had a great start to the Summer Reading Challenge this year –  over sixty children have already signed up to take part and three children have already finished. This means they have read and talked about six books with library staff. More information about this summer reading scheme ( as well as lots of exciting summer events) can be found on our Summer Reading Challenge webpage.

Chatterbooks
Chatterbooks

I told the children who came to our last Chatterbooks reading group all about the Summer Reading Challenge and I encouraged them all to take part.  The children like the ‘creepy’ theme and really enjoyed doing a Creepy House word search.

Our next Chatterbooks meeting will be on Monday 16 September. If you’d like your child to to come along please speak to a  member of library staff. There’s also more information on our Chatterbooks webpage.

Babita Sinha
Babita Sinha

Babita Sinha

Senior Customer Services Assistant

Premier League Reading Stars at Brompton Library

Premier League Reading Stars logo
Premier League Reading Stars logo

In our May 2013 blog post I wrote about the Premier League Reading Stars (PLRS) scheme we’ve been hosting at Brompton Library with children from one of our local schools, St Cuthbert with St Matthias. We’ve had a “fixture” every Tuesday after school for the last ten weeks.

Rob Symmons, from Chelsea library, and I have been delivering football-themed activities with the goal of improving the children’s literacy skills and embedding an enthusiasm for reading. It’s been an interesting learning experience for us as well as the kids with some yellow cards handed out along the way but, at the final whistle, we’re all over the moon that the season has now ended! (Apologies for the high number of footballing clichés in that last sentence!)

In mid-June we had an away fixture at Queens Park Rangers Football Club who supported PLRS for the second year running. Jesse Foyle, QPR’s Education Manager, gave us a behind-the-scenes tour of the ground and then sprang a quiz on our players. It was a big ask but they rose to the occasion.

Our final fixture allowed us to celebrate the children’s achievements with their proud parents and families – each child gets a certificate and we had party food and drinks. By the time you read this I can honestly say – they think it’s all over, it is now!

Stephanie Webb
Stephanie Webb

Stephanie Webb

Lending Librarian

The Brompton Blog – June 2013

Brompton Library
Brompton Library

Another month has rapidly passed and we reach the mid-point of the year. As holiday season is approaching, students are cramming for final exams, people are preparing for their summer holidays and the British public look forward to the birth of a Royal baby, here is what has been happening at Brompton Library since we last posted.

(If you’re joining us for the first time, this is the monthly blog post from Brompton Library that highlights some of the events, activities and services that our library provides.)

Books on Prescription

Books on Prescription
Books on Prescription

June saw the launch of Books on Prescription scheme in which healthcare professionals welcomed members of the public into our meeting room and offered a range of free advice, health checks, head massages and free fruit deserts for the afternoon.

This was a chance to promote an initiative to help people to use self-help books to manage common conditions such as anxiety, depression and stress through reading books based on CBT (cognitive behavioural therapy). I got a chance to speak with a few patrons who were really impressed with the ideas and advice that was on offer. Another positive day in the library!

There’s more information about this scheme on our Books on Prescription page on our website.

Stephanie Webb
Stephanie Webb

Stephanie Webb

Lending Librarian

Bear masks, Dear Zoo and a new Children’s Laureate

Goldilocks and the three bears
Goldilocks and the three bears

The Brompton Children’s Library half term craft event was well attended. We read Goldilocks and the Three Bears and had colouring pictures of the bears out walking and another of baby bear discovering Goldilocks in his bed! We made bear masks so we could be pretend to be bears as well.

Dear Zoo by Rod Campbell
Dear Zoo by Rod Campbell

The first Saturday of every month we have a story and craft session. This month we read Dear Zoo by Rod Campbell. We made a surprise picture with a flap like the illustrations in Dear Zoo. Everyone liked the dog picture we had to go under the flap. We are very pleased to hear that Malorie Blackman is the new Children’s Laureate. We have displayed books of hers that we have in stock.

Elisabeth Brown
Elisabeth Brown

Elisabeth Brown

Senior Customer Services Assistant

Katie’s Corner

The Island by Victoria Hislop
The Island by Victoria Hislop

Our monthly reading group met and discussed The Thread by Victoria Hislop this month.

Set in Thessaloniki, it is as much a biography of the city’s turbulent history as it is of the characters within the book. Set in the current time, a young man is considering relocating there or moving back to the UK. Surprised by his grandparent’s devotion to this city, they start to recount their own lives, through war, desolation, strife, and love.

This is a powerfully moving story and it was a gripping read. Victoria Hislop has really done her research into this place. The real events and politics of this country and the varying cultures of their land ripped into this city – its survival of all that happens to it is inspiring in itself. Everyone really enjoyed this book and it sparked off a debate about politics. That’s what I love about our reading group, we can dovetail into fascinating discussions – strong views are welcomed!

The only thing which we did find disappointing about the book was that it tended to go off into a Mills and Boon ending, where things got tied up very neatly. Overall though we all thoroughly enjoyed this book and would recommend it.

Next month we’ll be reading ‘Various Pets Alive and Dead’ by Marina Lewycka. I am really looking forward to this! Details of when and where we meet can be found on the reading groups page on our website.

Katie Collis
Katie Collis

Katie Collis

Senior Customer Services Assistant