17 Books for 2017

Here are seventeen books we recommend you read this year!

1. The Humans by Matt Haig
This book is about an alien’s trip to earth, but it’s also about what it means to be human. It’s funny and uplifting and it explains the difficulties and the joys of being alive.

2. Slade House by David Mitchell
This is a clever ghost story about a paranormal house. You never know whether you can trust what you’re reading.

3. The Silent Sister by Diane Chamberlain
A dramatic family saga full of secrets and lies. Gripping! Continue reading “17 Books for 2017”

Booker Prize Reading Challenge: The Sellout by Paul Beatty & Eileen by Otessa Moshfegh

selloutThe second book in my Booker Prize Reading Challenge is The Sellout by Paul Beatty. This book is set in ‘Dickens’,  a farmland area just outside of Los Angeles. A man is recalling his childhood of growing up under a very peculiar father who carries out experiments on him and the wonderfully colourful people that he knows.

The only problem is that he is going to embark on something which is so profoundly against popular culture and society that he is not just going to be a sellout but the ridicule and laughing stock of America.

I cannot give away too much about this book but it is at times hysterically funny – I’ve had quite a few laugh out loud moments on the tube home. It leads me to think that Beatty could have had a career as a stand-up comic and his political monologues are very prescient, almost Doug Stanhope. The characters are really well drawn, also very very funny but people who you could sympathise with, especially the main character. The problem with this book (in my opinion) is that it doesn’t quite grab your attention the whole way through.

I think it is a very original piece of work and it’s probably the funniest book that I have read.

 

eileenThe third book on my list is Eileen by Otessa Moshfegh

 A considerably older woman (Eileen) is looking back on her life to when she was a 24 year old. Living in ‘X-ville’ with her drunken and disturbed father and without a Mum she has a very restricted life of a job she really can’t stand, people who she doesn’t really want to work with. The odd crush on the security guard keeps her going. That is until a new colleague, Rebecca turns up and breathes new life into her. Their friendship leads to an even darker place and Eileen has some radical decisions to make.

 This is a deeply unsettling book but it was so compelling that I could not put it down. The microcosm of Eileen’s young life is fascinating and her inner world is fuelled by awkwardness, self-loathing and flights of fantasy. You cannot help but cringe in parts, but that’s down to Moshfegh’s brilliant writing. I am not going to spoil the ending but it is seismic. Think of works by Patricia Highsmith and Donna Tartt and you are getting close.

 So thus far it is my favourite on the shortlist as it feels like a complete novel – it is chilling, diabolical and her descriptions of the landscape make you feel as if you are living inside it. Brilliant.

 Next book that I am reading is All That Man Is by David Szalay, I have high hopes for this one!

Katie

 

 

50 books that make great films (Grand Finale)

In our last ’50 books that make great films’ post, we round out the list with the final 10 selections. A huge thank you to the staff members that participated in this series – it wouldn’t have been possible without you, and I hope it’s been as fun to follow as it was to organise!

Visit our previous posts to see the other 40 titles. As usual, let us know what you think in the comments section below!

Previous posts: [Part One] [Part Two] [Part Three] [Part Four]

Continue reading “50 books that make great films (Grand Finale)”

50 books that make great films (Part Four)

And we’re back!

In our penultimate post, we explore another 10 book adaptations – as chosen by your library staff. Visit our previous posts to see the what books/films have already made the list and let us know what you think in the comment section below!

[Part One] [Part Two] [Part Three]

 

Continue reading “50 books that make great films (Part Four)”

50 books that make great films (Part Three)

I am back with another installment in our ’50 books that make great films’ series! We’re making great progress, and we are officially halfway through the list! If you haven’t already, check out our first two posts (Part 1 | Part 2) and see how many of the films listed you’ve seen and enjoyed. As usual, feel free to share your thoughts in the comment section below.

Continue reading “50 books that make great films (Part Three)”

50 books that make great films (Part Two)

Last week, we introduced you to 10 titles from our 50 favourite book adaptations. This week, we are back with another 10 for your enjoyment! Remember to let us know what your favourites in the comment section below.

Continue reading “50 books that make great films (Part Two)”

50 books that make great films (Part One)

It seems that most films today are either a remake, a sequel (and we’re including prequels here), or a book adaptation. They say that ‘the book is always better’ and it’s a sentiment we almost always agree with.

Staff from across the borough have come together to compile fifty of their favourite book adaptations. Over the next five weeks we will explore all fifty titles –let us know your personal favourites! Continue reading “50 books that make great films (Part One)”

New books for August

The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins

Girl on the Train

YOU DON’T KNOW HER. BUT SHE KNOWS YOU.

Rear Window meets Gone Girl, in this exceptional and startling psychological thriller
Rachel catches the same commuter train every morning. She knows it will wait at the same s even started to feel like she she calls them. Their
life – as she sees it – is perfect. If only Rachel could be that happy.
And then she sees something shocking. It’s only a minute until the train moves on,
but it’s enough.
Now everything’s changed. Now Rachel has a chance to become a part of the lives
she’s only watched from afar.
Now they’ll see; she’s much more than just the girl on the train … Continue reading “New books for August”

Brompton Library Graphic Novel Reading Group

Hello and welcome to the Brompton Library Graphic Novel Reading Group. We talk about comics, graphic novels, web-comics and pop culture.

For August’s session (Thursday 4th, 6pm), we will be discussing cult classic ‘GHOST WORLD’ by Daniel Clowes. The book was made into a film featuring Scarlett Johansson, Thora Birch and Steve Buscemi in 2001. Continue reading “Brompton Library Graphic Novel Reading Group”

Brompton Library Graphic Novel Reading Group – July

For July’s session (Thursday 7th, 6pm), we will be discussing the graphic novel behemoth that is ‘WATCHMEN’ by Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons:

WatchmenGN

“In an alternate world where the mere presence of American superheroes changed history, the US won the Vietnam War, Nixon is still president, and the cold war is in full effect. ”

Watchmen begins as a murder-mystery, but soon unfolds into a planet-altering conspiracy.

In the mid-eighties, Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons created Watchmen, changing the course of comic history and essentially remaking how popular culture perceived the genre. Popularly cited as the point where comics came of age, Watchmen’s sophisticated take on superheroes has been universally acclaimed for its psychological depth and realism.”

If you have any other suggestions for the reading list then please let me know and we’ll try our best to accommodate.

So far we have the following for consideration:

  • Ghost World
  • Transmetropolitan
  • Sandman
  • 20th century Boys
  • Promethia
  • Fight Club
  • Swamp Thing
  • Democracy
  • Trees
  • Diary of a Teenage Girl
  • Miracleman
  • Hip Hop Family Tree
  • Pride of Baghdad
  • The Bad Doctor
  • Y: The Last Man

The reading group takes place on the first Thursday evening of every month.

See you there! Bring snacks!

David Bushell
Customer Services Assistant
Brompton Library