Harry Potter Book Night at Chelsea Library

On Thursday 1 February 2018, Chelsea Library joined hundreds of other libraries and schools in celebrating a special Harry Potter Book Night: Fantastic Beasts at Chelsea Library. It was a challenge to organize such event on a Thursday, after school, when children have arranged activities, but we had a great turnout. Suddenly, we had several Harry Potters, Gryffindor girls, wand duelling in the biography section under the watchful eye of J.K. Rowling (and alerted parents), toddlers who wanted to join in (and got a chance to colour Hedwig). A fantastic start!

 

We prepared a selection of exciting activities to mark this unique event: from arts and crafts, quizzes and games, word searches, and our photo competition ‘Magical creatures and architecture’. Although the idea was to place Harry Potter enthusiastic fans into various Hogwarts houses, we soon gave up as most of them wanted to be with their friends in Gryffindor. They all got house stickers and, after the welcoming introduction, we began with the first activity: decorate your magical creature.

I sketched the outline of four magical creatures – dragon, phoenix, griffin and hippogriff – four groups of children around four tables, had a task to decorate in 30 minutes their beasts to win reward points. Colouring pencils, crayons, feathers, felt tips and all sorts of collage papers were available. The team work was exceptional; and the parents got involved as well! While me and my colleagues, Christian, Colette ran around checking their progress. With so much fantastic creativity and effort, it was a very difficult task to choose the winners.

Luckily, we were able to declare all four groups the winners since so many of the local shops and restaurants in the King’s Road – Habitat, Pizza Express, Tiger, Venchi and Waterstone’s– had generously donated prizes and Waitrose had donated food for the event. The library almost looked like Weasleys’ Wizard Wheezes shop. What a joy! I felt great giving out the presents to cheering children.

These are the final masterpieces!

Lots of entries for our photo competition, ‘Magical creatures and architecture’ arrived two weeks before the closing date. I’ve noticed that many of us take for granted beautiful architecture we pass on our way to work, to school, to the local park etc. J. K. Rowling’s magical creatures – dragons, griffins, hippogriffs, snakes, witches, mermaids, fairies, nymphs, sphinx … well they can be seen everywhere in London. When Christopher Wren designed St Mary-le-Bow church in Cheapside, after the Great Fire of London, he probably did not have Harry Potter in mind. Nevertheless, on the tall church spire a huge dragon holds a golden sphere! If you haven’t seen it, go and check for yourself.

Four judges – Roberta, Liam, Silva and Shaun – came, seriously observed the photographs and decided that Tabitha’s entry was the best. Maximilian, Carla, Max, Arthur, Lorenzo, Marko, Mateo, Jacopo, Tristan, Jack, Fredie, Maya, Noeleen, Leon, Leonella, Mila and another Leon were other successful competitors. All the children, who were rewarded by points from out judges, received prizes.

It was time for a quick snack and to get ready for the master quiz. While some younger participants needed to move from ‘watching films’ to reading Harry Potter books, several children showed admirable knowledge. Colette was very impressed!

We finished the party by playing musical-magical-statues and had great fun.

There were more activities ready in my ‘sorting hat’, but we didn’t have enough time. Next time! Meanwhile, don’t forget:

“Never Tickle a Sleeping Dragon.”

Zvezdana, Chelsea Library

 

 

Advertisements

Vote 100 2018

This month’s display of books at Kensington Central Library from our Biography Collection is to mark that 100 years ago today women got the vote for the first time.

 

On 6 February 1918, royal assent was given to the Representation of the People Act, and for the first time over 8 million British women were entitled to vote. The original legislation enfranchised only those women who were over 30 and owned property above a certain value, or who were university graduates still living in the constituency of their university. (It took another decade for women’s eligibility to vote to be based on the same terms as men’s.) It was widely considered to be a recognition of women’s role in the First World War (as almost thirty years later, their role in the Second led to women being given the vote in France), but the change in the law was also preceded by several years of increasingly militant protest and agitation by women determined to end their exclusion from the democratic process.

This month, we mark the centenary of this momentous legislation with a special display of suffragette and suffragist biographies from our special Biography Collection in Kensington Central Library. From the most famous names of the movement, like the Pankhursts, to working class women like Annie Barnes, campaigners for the female franchise left fascinating accounts of how they struggled and why. Picking up the resonance of the bitter conflicts of a century ago, we can also hear the voice of Mrs Humphry Ward, a passionate opponent of women’s suffrage.

I was unable to put down, amongst others, the memoir of Lady Constance Lytton, who created an alter ego, complete with physical disguise, so as to serve her sentence in Holloway Prison without deriving any benefit from her aristocratic status. Her intimate, immediate account of the conditions of the suffragette prisoners as they were force fed, tortured by being hosed with water, and degraded with filthy clothes and bedding, is a deeply shocking reminder of how much was endured for the cause.

To tie in with this display, we are delighted to be marking the service to that cause of a local woman, Kate Parry Frye, with a talk by her biographer Elizabeth Crawford . Elizabeth Crawford will be focusing on the biographies of this Kensington activist and of some of her fellow suffragists, and author Sonia Lambert will be reading excerpts from fictionalised accounts of women’s experiences that she has created based on extensive reading of the testament of suffragettes. The event will take place at  Kensington Central Library on Monday 26 February, 6pm – 7.45 pm. Book your free place via Eventbrite

One of the challenges we face with our Biography Collection displays is that some of our most fascinating books are hiding behind some of our least alluring bindings! Although we’re all familiar with the adage “never judge a book by its cover”, we are always looking for ways to entice potential readers to overcome their resistance to borrowing these less than beautiful-looking volumes. This has proved particularly true this month, with some of our truly compulsive suffragette memoirs looking, frankly, a little unglamorous. Our solution is to enhance these with a wrapper showing a picture of the author, and a quote from the text which will hopefully whet your appetites.

The Biography Store Team at Kensington Central Library

Our graphic novel reading group

On the second Monday of every month, our graphic novel reading group meets at Brompton Library.

The group is run by David at Brompton Library, and he spoke to three of its members to find out what they like about the group and their favourite graphic novels.

Mike 

What is it about the reading group that you enjoy?

In this my first year , what impressed me was the range of the graphic novel form. I started reading comic books as a kid and then came back in the 1990s by discovering the subculture with its fairs and cons, trying out books like Joe Sacco’s Palestine and manga like Akira. The diversity I discovered through the group is reflected in members’ choice of works and how we discuss them. Other readers’ focus on imagery has certainly advanced my appreciation of how to discuss sequential art.

What has been your favourite graphic novel that you’ve read?

My joint favourite works this year were both mentioned in the group: Democracy by
Alecos Papadotos, Abraham Kawa and Annie DiDonna, which is historical fiction, and
Ghost World by Daniel Clowes, a teenage novel.
Democracy tells the story of one turning point in the history of ancient Athens. It satisfies both as a story and as an introduction to the subject. It has an art of strong colours with an edge of blackness but it’s no lecture. Ghost World is a narrower canvas with smaller panels and is the tale of a friendship in a small town – two girls growing up and growing apart. It seems that as well as mind-challenging futures, like Ghost in the Shell, a ‘graphic’ can tell a simple story like this with all its resonance in pictures and character. Reading it on the tube seemed more involving than sheer prose, even though it’s not fantasy as such.
Lastly, my time in the group has convinced me that the ‘graphic’ still has great possibilities which haven’t yet been fully explored.

Lara

What is it about the reading group that you enjoy?

I’ve really enjoyed being a club member for exactly that reason; it’s helped introduce me to great reads that I would have never have investigated on my own, as well as giving me access to comics I’ve wanted to read for a long time. Plus, it’s been really fun getting to know the other members too. Before I joined, I was apprehensive about not being accepted, as I didn’t have much knowledge about certain comics. But now, I really look forward to and enjoy spending at least an hour a week discussing our thoughts on the comics we’ve read together, especially because we’re all from very different comic-reading backgrounds so everyone can have very different perspectives and opinions.

I was also happily surprised at just how many graphic novels and manga titles the library has to offer. I can really recommend a lot of the available manga, but one in particular that we read with the group was, 20th Century Boys written and illustrated by Naoki Urasawa; This was a series I had really wanted to read for a while. It’s an incredibly gripping conspiracy drama with cleverly thought out engaging characters and a cliff-hanger ending with every volume so it was great to get the opportunity to read a lot into the series using the library’s copies.

All in all, joining the group has been one of the simplest, most rewarding things I’ve done in 2017, and I really recommend to anyone interested in comics or graphic novels, to join us in 2018!!

20th Century Boys

What has been your favourite graphic novel that you’ve read?

My favourite read this year has been Transmetropolitan written by Warren Ellis and co-created and designed by Darick Robertson. I usually read manga/Japanese comics, and joined the library’s graphic novel group to expand my reading into more western-style comics. Transmetropolitain is a great mix of weird, surreal, pseudo-political, futuristic sci-fi that I really enjoy. I think it has a great script, strong and funny characters and fabulous artwork to give depth to the whole universe, and I probably never would have discovered it without the group.

Transmetropolitain

Tari

What is it about the reading group that you enjoy?

What I like about attending the reading group is that we get read things I wouldn’t necessarily want to read myself, but it allows me to hear from from other perspectives what resonates with them about the books. Because there is no standard format for comics in terms of art style or presentation, people tend to gravitate to different elements of a graphic novel, and it’s nice being able to see what types of art have the most impact on people. I like that a couple members of the group are also interested in other social events related to comics and it’s a good opportunity to learn more about what wider comics events are happening around London, and who is involved. It’s a great starting point to open you up about the possibility of involving yourself with other comics events.

What has been your favourite graphic novel that you’ve read?

My favourite graphic novel that we read at the library’s reading group this year was Miracleman by ‘the original writer’ aka Alan Moore. The story really drew me in as it explored some ideas I didn’t expect to see come up. I could see the beginnings of how Alan Moore would approach deconstructing the concept of the superhero and the world they live; an idea that he would take even further in Watchmen. But honestly I felt that of the two books, Miracleman was the easier to digest. It was more of a personal journey and transformation of one guy discovering what it means to be a superhero in the real world. Delving into the toll that the title of ‘supehero’ would take on you and the ones around you. Including the sacrifice of one’s humanity, and being forced to ascend into something more. Which came with its own questions of how the world would regard such a being. I read ahead onto the further volumes and appreciated how the story evolved into something grander each time. It focused on the progressively wider circle of influence Miracleman had on people in life, the world around him, and the possible utopian or dystopian futures he could bring about.

Miracleman

Many, many thanks to Mike, Lara and Tari for sharing their thoughts with us. They’ll next meet on Monday 12 February at 6.30pm and they’ll be discussing The Flintstones by Mark Russell. Like to get involved? Email david.bushell@rbkc.gov.uk for more info.

We’d also like to thank Gosh Comics and the London Graphic Novel Network for their support.

Author Katherine Arden to visit Brompton Library

We are very excited to announce that in April author, Katherine Arden will visit Brompton Library. Katherine is the author of The Bear and the Nightingale and The Girl in the Tower, the first two books in the Winternight trilogy. She will read from the third book in the trilogy, The Winter of the Witch, which is due to be published in August this year. The trilogy is inspired by the fairy tales and folklore of medieval Russia that Katherine read while living there, and set in its snowy landscape.

To celebrate her visit, we will be reading the first two Winternight novels during February and March. Join us on Thursday 8 February when we will be discussing The Bear and the Nightingale which has been described as haunting, lyrical and a beautiful deep-winter story full of magic and monsters.

In a village at the edge of the wilderness of northern Russia, where the winds blow cold and the snow falls many months of the year, an elderly servant tells stories of sorcery, folklore and the Winter King to the children of the family, tales of old magic frowned upon by the church.

But for the young, wild Vasya, these are far more than just stories. She alone can see the house spirits that guard her home, and sense the growing forces of dark magic in the woods…

‘Frost-demons have no interest in mortal girls wed to mortal men. In the stories, they only come for the wild maiden.’

These books are suitable for children aged 14 years plus. Katherine says:

“My absolute favorite thing to hear from a reader: ‘I read your book and then I gave it to my daughter.’”

To get your copy, please visit Brompton Library, or email libraries@rbkc.gov.uk to get a copy sent to your local library.

If you’d like to attend the special reading group meeting in February, please book a place via Eventbrite

Edited to add – the next meeting of this special reading group will be on Thursday 8 March where they’ll discuss the second book in Katherine’s trilogy, ‘The Girl in Tower’. For more info or to book your free place, please visit Eventbrite

Fiona at Brompton Library

Bond behind the scenes

Last week we had a reading list from the staff at Brompton Library all about Young James Bond. This week they’re back with a collection of books that take us behind the scenes of Britain’s most successful action movie series.

Some Kind of Hero: The Remarkable Story of the James Bond Films

Following the highs and lows of the Bond film franchise from when it started in the 1960s up to its present day resurgence in popularity. Drawing on hundreds of previously unpublished interviews with cast and crew, a definitive guide for all fans.

Bond on Bond

Who better to give an inside look at the Bond films than everyone’s favourite Bond, Roger Moore. Giving us his inside view with his inimitable charm and charisma, Moore talks us through all the bond films and his involvement in them. Accompanied by many great shots of the gadgets, the cars and the Bonds’ themselves on the set and behind the scenes, this is the ultimate James Bond guide written by the ultimate Bond.

Blood, Sweat and Bond: Behind the Scenes of Spectre

A photographic account of the filming of Spectre with many great shots of the sets, the fight scenes and the actors at work and at play. There are also little bits of information about costumes, sets and shooting, as well as quotes from cast and crew. A beautiful book to savour over long after the film is finished.

We’ll be back with more reading lists soon, and do let us know (in the comments below) if Roger Moore isn’t your favourite Bond…

The staff at Brompton Library

Young James Bond

The staff at Brompton Library, after a well-deserved Christmas break, are back with some more reading lists – this time they’re about Bond, James Bond…

The last Ian Fleming Bond stories to be published was in 1966, two years after the writer’s death. Did you know that since then, there have been over 30 Bond novels and stories written by other authors including Kingsley Amis and Anthony Horowitz?

Not only that, but writer Charlie Higson has also created as series of novels based on the early life of the spy during his school years at Eton. Critics immediately dismissed the idea that the Young Bond novels would do justice to the iconic character of Bond but, after the publication of SilverFin, the first in the series, the critics were silenced and the whole series went on to achieve great success, including being made into a game and a series of graphic novels. There is even talk of a film being made, although this has not yet been confirmed. Charlie Higson has always said that he wanted to stay true to Ian Fleming’s vision of Bond and has only read the Fleming’s Bond stories.

Here is a summary of each of his Young Bond novels, all of which are available in our libraries in a range of formats from graphic novels to audiobooks, as well as paperbacks.

SilverFin

It’s James’ first day at Eton and he soon makes friends, and enemies. During the summer break he visits Scotland where he meets a boy called Red Kelly who’s looking for his missing cousin. They venture up the hill to Lake Silverfin where the adventure is just beginning.

Blood Fever

Back at Eton, James is now a member of a secret risk-taking club known as the Danger Society and one of his classmate’s family has gone missing. The summer brings more mystery and adventure when he travels to Sardinia on a field trip with one of his professors. He discovers another secret society known as the Millenia, a society who want to restore the Roman Empire. Is there a connection? Only Bond will find out…

Double or Die

Set entirely in England during Christmas, when a professor is kidnapped at gun point, a suspicious letter full of cryptic clues arrives at Eton leading Bond into the darkest corners of London. Once he as solved the clues, he has just forty-eight hours to save not just the professor, but the future of the rest of the world. Classic bond with Russian villains, a casino scene and a car chase, but will he get the girl in the end?

Hurricane Gold

Only danger is guaranteed in the exhilarating chase set in the Mexican jungle. Taken out of school by his aunt, James relaxes in the Mexican sun. When his aunt leaves him with the children of war hero Jack Stone, they get caught up in a political storm with gangsters, stolen government documents and a chase that leads to a Caribbean island.

By Royal Command

Following a treacherous Alpine rescue mission, Bond is back at Eton. All is not as it seems though, as his every move is being watched. He holds the clue to a sinister plot that will bring bloodshed and carnage to his school and his country. The only solution is to flee to Austria with only a beautiful but dangerous girl by his side. A nightmare reunion with a bitter enemy once again plunges him into the face of death.

We hope you enjoyed this, we’ll be back next week with more Bond books.

Staff at Brompton Library

Musical anniversaries 2018

This month’s display of books from the Biography Collection at Kensington Central Library showcases musicians with significant anniversaries in 2018. Those we have most books on in the collection are Leonard Bernstein (born 1918), Claude Debussy (died 1918), and Gioachino Rossini (died 1868), but we include many others.

Gioachino Rossini

Other hard copy resources for music in our libraries are:

• Scores in at Kensington Central Library’s store

• CDs at Kensington Central Library

• DVDs of operas, shows etc and books on music, across all all our libraries

• A special collection of music reference books at Kensington Central Library

All these can be looked for on our library catalogue

We also have resources online:

Naxos Music Library – we have a workshop about using this music streaming service, more details below

Biographical and newspaper online resources useful for musician biographies and performance and recording reviews

Naxos Music Library workshop

Naxos Music Library workshop
Friday 26 January
2 to 3pm
Kensington Central Library

Come along to our workshop to find out more about the Naxos Music Library, the music streaming service which is free for library members. You will be shown how to:

  • Access the service
  • Find the sort of music you are interested in
  • Find multiple recordings of a work, or all the recordings available on the site by one recording artist or composer
  • Put together a playlist of your favourite music
  • Share your favourite tracks or albums

This event is free, no need to book – just turn up.

The Biography Store Team at Kensington Central Library

Christmas modern crime fiction

The staff at Brompton Library have been really busy – putting together Christmas reading lists for children and adults alike. We’ve been publishing a list every morning since Tuesday on the blog this week.

Today our last list is Christmas modern crime fiction –

Merry Christmas Alex Cross

When Detective Alex Cross gets a phone call on the night before Christmas, he knows he won’t be good news. Henry Fowler has kidnapped his ex-wife and his children. He is high, armed and dangerously unstable. Meanwhile, a major terrorist attack is unfolding. Will Alex save the day…?

Murder in the Dark

Set in Australia in the 1920s our heroine Phryne Fisher, wealth aristocrat and private detective, is invited to the Last Best Party of 1928. When three party guest go missing, Phyrne must follow the scavenger hunt clues to find them. Part of the Phryne Fisher series.

The Other Mrs Walker

A detective story without a detective. When Mrs Walker passes away in a frosty, Edinburgh flat, she leaves only an emerald dress, six orange pips and a Brazil nut engraved with the ten commandments. Meanwhile, Margaret finds herself back in Edinburgh on a whim and working for the Office for Lost People. Given the task of finding out who Mrs Walker was, the unusual collection of objects leads her into the past of Mrs Walker and ultimately into her own story.

A Maigret Christmas

Nine of Simeon’s best Christmas tales set in Paris that see Inspector Maigret on cat and mouse chases all over the city, including following the trail of a mysterious intruder dressed in red and white. We see his paternal heart, as he is helped on many of the cases by some bright children.

How the Light Gets In

When Chief Inspector Gamache is sent to Three Pines to investigate the disappearance of a colleague’s friend, he discovers that the missing person is one of the most famous in the world. With no one he can trust, can he find a safe place for himself and his trusted colleagues?

Dying for Christmas

A chilling twist on the twelve days of Christmas when an obsessed stalker takes the object of his obsession hostage, he tries to win her over with a bizarre “gift” on each of the twelve days. Terrified that the final gift will be her death, Jessica has her own secret. Will it be enough to save her life?

We really hope you enjoyed these lists and have been inspired to try a festive read. Our libraries are open as usual up until Christmas Eve, more info here

Staff at Brompton Library

PS here are our previous lists: Christmas reads for younger childrenChristmas reads for older children and Christmas classic crime fiction

Christmas classic crime fiction 

The staff at Brompton Library have been really busy – putting together Christmas reading lists for children and adults alike. We’ve been publishing a list every morning since Tuesday on the blog this week.

Today it’s Christmas classic crime fiction –

It’s the perfect time to come in from the cold, turn off the TV and curl up with a crime novel. Fractured family gatherings, suspicions and intrigue in remote country houses, Christmas provides the perfect backdrop to a case of murder. Here is a selection of some of the best in festive crime fiction.

Mystery in White by J Jefferson Farjeon

‘The horror on the train, great though it may turn out to be, will not compare with the horror that exists here, in this house.’

When heavy snow brings a train to a halt near a small village some of the passengers find shelter in a country house. The fire has been lit and the table laid but no one is home. As they unravel the secrets of the house, a murder strikes. A chilling Christmas classic.

Hercule Poirot’s Christmas by Agatha Christie

When multi-millionaire Simeon Lee unexpectedly invites his estranged family for Christmas, suspicions are raised. As Simeon plays with his guests’ emotions, the festive games turn deadly as he is found brutally murdered. Everyone has a motive but only one man can find out whodunit. An especially bloody Agatha Christie Christmas classic.

Murder for Christmas by Francis Duncan

Christmas Eve in a country house and the party is in full swing. As the clock strikes midnight the revellers find there’s more than just presents under the tree. Luckily one of the guests is amateur sleuth Mordecai Tremaine! Find out who killed Father Christmas in this long-forgotten classic first written in 1949.

Silent Nights: Christmas Mysteries Edited by Martin Edwards

A collection of crime fiction from some of the best writers of the genre. A mixture of much-loved classics and more obscure tales, bringing together some of the finest crime fiction of the past.

The Santa Klaus Murder by Mavis Doriel Hay

A cocktail of all the right ingredients to make the perfect country house murder-mystery. The Melbury family patriarch is found shot in the head by a guest dressed as Santa Klaus. His family all have a motive but not Santa Klaus, the only guest with many chances to pull the trigger! Get immersed in the action right beside Constable of Haulmshire as each character tells you their statement.

Crimson Snow

A collection of crime stories set in Winter, often at Christmas. With mysterious tracks in the snow, some unpleasant carol singers and a very odd Santa Claus. A perfect collection of stories, each introduced by crime expert Martin Edwards.

The Mistletoe Murder

A collection of four of the best of P. D. James Christmas short stories, originally commissioned for magazines. Each of them tantalising puzzles to be solved, she keeps you guessing to the end with her atmospheric story telling.

The Thin Man

Set in December in 1930’s New York when prohibition is coming to an end. Can the rich and glamorous Nick and Nora Charles solve a murder case in between Martinis and fast-talking wise cracks?

Murder at the Vicarage : A Christmas Mystery

As the snow deepens around the village of Byford and its residents are settling down for Christmas, the vicar’s son-in-law is murdered. With a difficult personal relationship and a group of suspects all trying to sabotage the investigation, Jill McGowan pays homage to Agatha Christie in this classic with a rather uncosy twist.

See you tomorrow for our final list!

Staff at Brompton Library

PS here are our previous lists: Christmas reads for younger children and Christmas reads for older children

Christmas reads for older children

The staff at Brompton Library have been really busy – putting together Christmas reading lists for children and adults alike. We’ll be publishing each list every morning on the blog for the rest of this week.

Today it’s Christmas reads for older children – a collection of classic tales and modern takes on Christmas themes for older children.

The Haunting of Charity Delafield

An old-fashioned tale of a girl brought up with no mother and a strict father in a vast remote house. Unable to leave the house due to an unnamed illness, Charity knows little of the outside world, or even about her own family and has just her cat and a nurse to keep her company. She is haunted by a recurring dream about a secret corridor hidden in the house. When one day she finds the corridor, it leads her on a journey of discovery about her mysterious past.

The Christmas Mystery

When a boy buys an advent calendar, he finds that each door of the calendar tells the story of a little girl who chased after a lamb and ended-up travelling back in time to Bethlehem at the time of Jesus’ birth. As he opens more doors he also finds out more about the man who made the calendar and Elizabeth Hansen a girl who disappeared many years earlier. Stories within stories in this magical Christmas mystery.

Letters from Father Christmas

Every year on Christmas Eve in the Tolkein house, a letter would arrive from Father Christmas. Tolkein wrote these for his children. The letters include stories and sketches and tales of an accident prone polar bear. Delightful for all ages.

The Fox at the Manger (we currently don’t have a copy in our catalogue but staff have requested it)

Christmas Eve and the bells of St Paul’s are ringing for the first time since the end of the war. Three boys make fun of the service until the hear the story of Christmas told by a fox and their innocence is restored. Written by Mary Poppins author L.P. Travers and recently reissued, The Fox at the Manger reminds us of the true meaning of Christmas.

A Boy Called Christmas

Born on Christmas day, Nikolas is given the nickname Christmas. When his woodcutter father is given the chance to work in the land of elves, Nikolas is left with his child-hating Aunt Carlotta but after a few months, he can stand it now more and leaves to find his father. The story of Father Christmas came to be, a magical and fun modern classic.

The Little House in the Big Woods

Part of the Little House on the prairie series, its wintertime and the Ingalls family live among the wild animals. The story tells how they live together in harmony and sometimes in fear of danger.

Mistletoe and Murder

When Daisy and Hazel go to snowy Cambridge for the Christmas holidays Hazel is expecting dreamy spires and cosy fires. Two days before Christmas there is a terrible accident. Or was it an accident. Daisy and Hazel must do everything they can to solve the mystery before Christmas.

The Dark is Rising

Its midwinter’s Eve and Will can sense that something is not right. When he wakes up and finds himself in a snow-ravaged wintery land, he realises he must find six circles of light by twelfth night to stop the world being taken over by dark forces.

The Christmasaurus

From inside the flap:

“Forget everything you thought you knew about the North Pole, pop a crumpet in the toaster and get ready to meet…a most unusual dinosaur.”

William never thought he’s find a dinosaur at the north pole, but he does! The magical home of Santa Claus brought to life as you’ve never seen it before.

Paddington and the Christmas Surprise

When Paddington visits Santa’s grotto he causes quite a stir when he gets lost in a grand London department store, but will he get to meet Santa?  A fun tale from our best loved bear.

Michael Morpurgo’s Christmas Stories

A tale on a farm, a fairy tale, Christmas in World War I and the Nativity story.  Four beautifully illustrated tales from the children’s laureate.

Reindeer Girl

On Christmas Eve on holiday in Norway, Lotta wakes up to find herself in her Grandmother’s story. She has her own reindeer and calf to look after. When the reindeer goes missing, will Lotta find her before the calf dies? And can she ever go back to ordinary life?

Little Women

Louisa May Alcott’s classic tale of coming of age with the March sisters, as they prepare for Christmas without their father. Beautifully told with real and likeable characters. A very moving and timeless story.

See you tomorrow!

Staff at Brompton Library

PS – yesterday’s post was Christmas reads for younger children